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Doodlers Unite – with Sunni Brown

I was so happy to come across this great TED talk where Sunni Brown talks about the misconceptions and benefits of doodling. It’s under 6 minutes and worth the watch!


2 thoughts on “Doodlers Unite – with Sunni Brown”

  1. Good stuff… is there an opportunity for a course on “How to Doodle?” What an incredible note-taking system… as long as we don’t call it a system and put too much structure on it.

    Another good thing–it’s easier to understand doodling than it is concept mapping.

  2. I found this comment posted on a linked in discussion:

    Marian Thier • Two wonderful books that support Brown’s research are The Brain at Work by David Rock and Incognito by David Eagleman. For my work on listening, I watched an experiment in which people were hooked up to an EEG while they listened to different presentations. In most cases regions of the brain activated according to their well-established listening habits. In other words, their brains listened to some information and ignored others. In my work, I’ve identified four primary listening habits. One of them, Conceptualizing Listeners, listen for ideas and options. When they doodle while listening, they are more attentive and grasp more of the information being presented. When they begin to “cartoon” or “draw”, their attention and grasp diminish, as noted in Louis’s comments.

    And we can’t overlook all the research that supports other ways of moving about while listening–foot tapping, getting out of seat, standing meetings, Zen garden, dabbling with clay (for non-drawers), etc. Apparently they are all effective ways of letting off nervous energy that allows the brain to focus. These are not multi-tasking because they do not require neural pathway/brain power devotion to execute; rather they deter things such as list-making, internal dialogue, typing, etc. all activities that do require brain involvement.

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