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What to do with a Rubber Chicken

Sure, a rubber chicken is always good for a laugh, but an “on-topic” laugh is always better than one that is not topic related.  When it IS content-relevant, it can help make your learning point more memorable.

So the question is: can a rubber chicken help your group learn and remember new information?  Perhaps . . .

Here are some funny ways to involve a rubber chicken in your training or teaching:

  • Use it as a microphone when students are answering questions
  • Use it as a pointer
  • If nobody is answer your questions . . .  ask the chicken
  • Hold it up to indicate that the point you’re about to make, or just made is worthy of special attention

 


1 thought on “What to do with a Rubber Chicken”

  1. I have never used a rubber chicken, but I do have a use for a plastic Halloween hand every once in a while.

    We do team building events and trainings, focusing on the issues of competition versus collaboration in the optimization of organizational performance. The different tables engage in something we call, “My Team, My Team, My Team” and choose to compete rather than work together, even though the goal is, “To mine as much gold as WE can.”

    So, in the occasional debrief where we are working with people that we know will be highly aggressive against each other and who are focused on winning, I will sometimes “Give the Winners a Hand” as a kind-of request for everyone to applaud these winners. Generally, the group does not so much applaud as jeer!

    So, I am prepared to give them a hand. And I do, much to the delight of all the others as we then shift the discussion toward the issues of why teams choose to compete rather than collaborate.

    Makes for a fun discussion, for sure.

    (Can I get a hand for that contribution?)

    For the FUN of It!

    Scott

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